Drugs have always been a slow dagger, but one of the most dangerous ones gets even less attention than it deserves. At first glance one would think that an anti-anxiety drug like Xanax and other benzodiazepines would be a relatively “safe” drug to abuse, insofar as any drug is. However, they are not designed for long-term use, and cause more damage the longer they’re used, with overdoses and withdrawals that grow so dangerous, they’re on par with opioids and other deadly drugs. Benzos are extremely dangerous, and quitting them as soon as possible is the best way to deal with a possible growing addiction.

 

Examples of Use

Discovery InstituteIn Las Vegas, a bunch of kids holding a party in an empty house ended up with a kid shot in the head. A major player in the case against the suspect is Xanax, one of several “benzo” anti-anxiety drugs that can get users high, leading these teens to play a game of Russian Roulette. Teens looking for parties aren’t the only ones using and falling victim to benzos either; many celebrities, including Whitney Houston, Michael Jackson, and Fergie also struggled with the drugs. It is because of this that some celebs are speaking out against using benzos like Xanax, so people like the Las Vegas teens don’t fall prey.

 

Getting Help

First, to quit benzos, one must first recognize they’re addicted, or have some degree of dependence on them. Then, they have to be willing to accept help. Only a heart open to change will actually undergo change. Finally, they have to go and get the treatment. There are several kinds of help out there, but the details aren’t as important as the mindset. A willingness to turn one’s life around is how a person escapes from drugs.

If you know someone who abuses Xanax or any other drug and need help moving toward sober living in New Jersey again, contact us at 844-478-6563.

Reviewed for Medical & Clinical Accuracy by Dr. Jeffrey Berman, MD

Dr. Jeffrey Berman, MDDr. Jeffrey Berman is a psychiatrist in Teaneck, New Jersey and is affiliated with Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital. He received his medical degree from State University of New York Upstate Medical University and has been in practice for more than 20 years. He also speaks multiple languages, including French and Hebrew.

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