The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has released guides for states to better be able to deploy Medicaid to fight the opioid crisis in America. The guides focus on services meant to help infants born addicted to opioid medications through the parent-child blood connection, as well as on how to control the programs that monitor prescription medicines carried by patients. These guides will apply to all states. The Trump Administration and other government agencies have expressed great interest in making sure Medicaid and other programs are able to contend with the powerful effect the crisis has had on the American population.

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The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) on Monday released guidance aimed at helping states leverage Medicaid to combat the opioid epidemic.

Specifically, the guidance focused on information related to covering services for infants born exposed to opioids and how to enhance federal funding for telemedicine and programs that keep tabs on patients’ prescriptions.

The opioid epidemic has caught the attention of both lawmakers and administration officials, both of which are working to combat a growing crisis that has shown no signs of slowing down.

“The number of American infants born dependent on opioids each day is heartbreaking,” Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Alex Azar said in a press release.

“Today’s announcement reflects the Trump Administration and HHS’s commitment to helping states use Medicaid to support treatment for this condition and other challenges produced by our country’s crisis of opioid addiction.” Click Here to Continue Reading

Reviewed for Medical & Clinical Accuracy by Dr. Jeffrey Berman, MD

Dr. Jeffrey Berman, MDDr. Jeffrey Berman is a psychiatrist in Teaneck, New Jersey and is affiliated with Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital. He received his medical degree from State University of New York Upstate Medical University and has been in practice for more than 20 years. He also speaks multiple languages, including French and Hebrew.

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